High Performance Athletes Common Characteristics: Great coaching

This week I round out the major characteristics of high performing athletes (HPAs). The characteristic outlined this week is focused on great coaching. All high performing athletes willingly seek great coaching because of the insatiable drive to improve. 

In the mind of an elite high performing athlete they must find ways to get better!  Insider their mind there is a constant drive to improve. For them, the ceiling is glass, it can be broken. Even if at the top of their game, HPA’s are certain that more coaching will give them what they need to break through another next level. High performing athletes seek out coaches because the drive to improve is great than arrogance that they’re already at the top of their game. 

Coaching chalkboard

For example, in the book Relentless Tim Grover illuminates the unyielding pursuit of excellence by some of the NBA’s past and present superstars. In other professional sports such as baseball, even the game’s greatest hitters are known to take regular hitting lessons.  In fact, if you do some research you will surely find that top athletes of every professional sport seek out great coaches. 

Here are three reasons to seek a great coach: 
1. Coaches know first hand what is necessary for an athlete to become great. Great coaches see the things players cannot see. Therefore can help you make positive improvements.

2.Great coaches also understand what it takes for you to achieve at your highest level. They comprehend your vision and therefore will push you past the point of self induced limitations.

Great coaches have motivate you to achieve greatness. 

Firmly, I believe that great coaches make great players. In contrast, great players don’t make great coaches. Don’t believe me, think about how many coaches fail even though their team is stacked with great players? So if you are willing to get coaching, don’t just go out and find any so-called coach, I encourage you to seek out a great coach. 

HIGH PERFORMING ATHLETES: COMMON CHARACTERISTICS- “HAVE TO”

This week I continue to outline major characteristics of high performing athletes (HPAs). For this week, the  characteristics  is one of those easily identifiable traits. It’s one that is so obvious that it makes other athletes (and often their parents) envious. I would further go on to say that this characteristic is one that can be learned. Its is like a match struck and put to a fire, smoldering then suddenly bursting into flame. 

This week I want to outline a characteristic in high performing athletes that is best described as “want to”. This characteristic is often partnered with words like passion, desire, drive and determination.  HPAs with this characteristic understand that “want to” means willing desire. It’s as if the putting in the work is a privilege and the pain of pushing the limits is actually enjoyable. In contrast, to “want to” is “have to”.  Athletes who “have to” require an amount of compromise and external motivation to put in the work. 

Photo by Ruben Leija on Unsplash

High performing athletes with “want to” are uncompromising. They put in the time for work outs. The do it because they love it, not because coach says to, or because their parents say so.  Instead, HPA’s with “want to”  put in the work because of the passion for the game. Further, they love to compete against others and against their personal personal records.    HPAs with “want to”  don’t have to be dragged out of bed. And they don’t have to rely on motivational hype to get started. No, instead they are self-motivated and self-driven. 

HPA’s with “want to” passion also realize that the externals of the game matter. The externals of the game make a difference so they put in the work in the gym, in training, in practice, outside of practice and in the film room. In their free time, they study the game to improve their sport IQ. With a critical eye, HPAs study themselves looking to evaluate and critique personal preparation, practice and performance. They also pay attention to what they eat, how they sleep, and who they hang out with.  Because HPAs with “want to “ recognizes that all of these things impact passion and performance. 

But as mentioned earlier, the “want to” characteristic can be learn. It is not exclusive only for a small group. No, with encouragement, confidence and focus new habits and routines can be develop that change “have to” athletes into “want to” high performing athletes.

What makes a high Performing athlete?

Soon 2020 will be here. In fact from the writing of this blog the new year is less than two weeks away.  So, as the New Year approaches its time to start thinking about how to perform at your highest level in 2020? 


When I was in high school there were dudes who were stellar athletes. Many of them were so athletic and naturally gifted well above their peers. But even though they were outstanding athlete, in the end they  never accomplish much. When their career ended they never went anywhere. Simply put, they were just gamers. Guys who just showed up, played well, but often failed to perform consistently at a high level. 


Helping athletes  perform at the highest level possible is what Elite Athletes Recruiting is all about.  So, heading into 2020 I will be sharing about several common characteristics that I have found in high performing athletes (HPA).


The first characteristic I have found of high performing athletes is clarity in the vision.  HPA’s with clarity of vision have a unique way to see themselves winning. HPA’s can take a goal, clearly envision it, then reverse engineer that goal to make a comprehensive plan of action clearly marking out the path to make their vision reality.  


But, clarity of vision isn’t just about winning, it is also about confidence. HPA’s with clarity of vision have a level of confidences about them that often gets mistaken for arrogance. Today, this is often labeled as “swag”. But swag isn’t what makes HPA’s confident. No, HPA’s know confidence as a result of knowing how many thousand physical and mental reps have already been invested.
Performing a high level implies that their is a level to attain.  HPA look have a clear vision and confidence in that vision so that they know what steps to take to get started. In all my years of coaching I have never known an athletes who is born great. But I have known athletes who have become great because they had  a clear of vision, understood what they wanted to achieve and were confident they that could get there. 

Tis the Recruiting Season

Now that Thanksgiving is over we can safely say that the holidays are officially here. In just two weeks time Christmas will be hear then soon after a New Year will be upon us.  For student-athletes hoping to get recruited December is a major season for recruiting .

My hope is for student-athletes to have a happy and merry recruiting season. So, I put together a short list for the student-athletes who are serious about getting recruited during the holiday season.

Here are a few items that should be on your list.

  1. Make sure to have quality highlight or skills video
  2. Update all stats or metrics to the most recent measurements.
  3. Purge social media of inappropriate posts. When in doubt, just delete it.
  4. Get on the phone. Call, text or email coaches at colleges
  5. Plan campus visits to colleges high on your radar
  6. Schedule then study for the ACT/SAT college entry exams.

Have questions? Need help? Get a FREE recruiting consultation on any of the items on this list by just clicking here or leave a comment below.

Coach Mike

2 Weeks in December

The high school football season for the most part is over. Except for a limited few states the final whistle has blown, gear returned, and final stats recorded. When it seem like its all finished, football recruiting, however, is just getting started.  Especially in these first two weeks in December the contact period resumes. But, only for two weeks. 

During the December contact period it is permissible for authorized athletic department staff member to have in person, off campus contacts with prospective student athletes. 

So, athletes, what can  can you do to improve your recruiting situation during these two weeks? 

  1. Get your highlight reel looking tight. By now you should have a full season highlight reel as well as a midseason highlight reel up on your Hudl page. 
  2. Broaden your reach with coaches you want to contact. Use more than one medium to contact coaches. Don’t just rely on twitter to blast out your Hudl link. Rely on email and text. And, if you’re brave enough, go old school by making a phone call. 
  3. Stay focused! Lots of recruiting happens at this time of year. Keep in mind that the contact period is only open for 2 weeks, then its back to the quiet period until January. So be patient with the process. 

Let me know how recruiting is going for you. Have questions about the recruiting process? Comment below or contact me on twitter or instagram (@michaelwoosley). I’m glad to help. 

What to know about official and unofficial college recruiting visits

Since this is the time of year for athletes to visit college campuses I thought it good to share a few helpful tips about official visits and unofficial visit. In most recruiting situations the official visit often follow one or more unofficial visits. Frequently, college coaches reserve official visits to make offers, but it is not uncommon to get a verbal offer outside of an official visit. 

By definition, an official visit is any visit to a college campus by a college-bound prospective student-athlete and his or her parents that is paid for by the college. This includes transportation, lodging, entertainment, food and as many as 3 tickets to a game. Conversely, campus visits paid for by the parents of the student-athlete is deemed and unofficial visit.

In total, student-athletes are permitted up to 5 official visits for D1 and D2 schools. However, only 1 official visit per school is allowed.
Photo by Travis Essinger on Unsplash

Traditionally, official visits have been reserved for Seniors only. However, since April 2018 new recruiting regulations have been implemented for sports such as baseball and softball, allowing  Junior and Senior student-athletes to take official visits after September 1st. In contrast, in many other sports, such as footballonly Senior student-athletes are permitted to take official visits.

In total, student-athletes are permitted up to 5 official visits for D1 and D2 schools. However, only 1 official visit per school is allowed. Parents and athletes should know that D3 and NAIA schools have no limit on official visits a student-athlete can take. Additionally, D3 and NAIA regulations are similar to those outlining the recruiting process of D1 and D2 schools where the prospective student-athlete is allowed 1 official visit per school.

Lastly, always keep this in mind that recruiting is a process. Many student-athletes and parents let their minds run wild with negative assumptions, especially when an official visit is not offered right away.  To reiterate, recruiting is a process and every coach has his or her method, budget and preference for recruiting. So, with this in mind I recommend to keep a clear head and a positive attitude. Try to relax, stay calm, and enjoy the process.

Finally, I would love to hear from athletes attending official or unofficial visits. Athletes can also tag me on twitter when posting about visits (@michaelwoosley). Also, if you need help preparing for a visit, I’m glad to schedule some time to help with preparations. Just send me an email at mwoosley@csaprepstar.com. 

Starting the recruiting process

Is your inbox full of invites to camps, showcases, combines and other “recruiting events”? Have you become frustrated by the promise of exposure only to pay a bunch of money then see your kid get minimal reps and very little exposure? 


Frustrating isn’t it? Most athletes and parents are. 


So, when is the best time to start the recruiting process? Thats the topic for today. 


Did you know that most prospects are identified before end of the sophomore year? (Thats the current class of 2022!)   However,  many parents are told by high school and club to wait. That’s not good advice. Here’s why.

 1. Waiting significantly reduces the amount of time for college coaches can properly evaluate players. 


2. College coaches can only recruit players they know about. (So if they don’t know about a you they can’t recruit you!)

3. For many sports, student-athletes can take official visits, recieve phone calls and even get offers starting September 1 Junior year. 


Bottomline, there isn’t as much recruiting time as you think. Thats why its best to start as early as possible.  Read my article, Checkpoints along the recruiting journey for year by year outline. 


It is certain, families that start the process early always have better recruiting results!  Why? Staring early allows time to work through the process. Plus, the extra time allows your family to be more strategic about recruiting events and will save thousands of dollars along the way!

If you want to know how to get started, text “Gameplan” to (480) 605-4050 free recruiting assessment to outline the recruiting process for you.